Tip: New Finder Commands #5: Hide/Show Sidebar

2009/08/27

[One of a series regarding Snow Leopard’s new Finder menu commands.]

In Leopard, hiding a Finder window toolbar with either View > Hide Toolbar or by clicking the Toolbar button meant the window’s sidebar also disappeared—and hiding the toolbar was the only way to hide the sidebar. Although hiding the toolbar still means the sidebar goes away, too, the opposite isn’t true: you can now hide the sidebar independently, leaving the toolbar available for quick-click commands on its buttons. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

TIP: New Finder Commands #4: Arrangements in Column View

2009/08/27

[One of a series regarding Snow Leopard’s new Finder menu commands.]

Hallelujah! What were they thinking last time around? In Leopard—for some unknown (if any) reason—choosing an arrangement for a column-view window required a trip to the View Options palette (through the View > Show Options command), while other window views were politely provided with an Arrange By submenu (and concomitant keyboard commands). Column-view windows now get the same courtesy.


TIP: New Finder Commands #3: Open and Close Window

2009/08/27

[One of a series regarding Snow Leopard’s new Finder menu commands.]

Press Option, and the File menu’s Open command changes to Open and Close Window (with the expected change of Command-O changing to Command-Option-O). This doesn’t sound like a useful command, does it? After all, opening and then closing the window automatically doesn’t give you much time to do anything, even if you’re a super-speedy reader. It is useful however, because its full name is “Open a new window for the selected folder, and close the one the folder is in.” Read the rest of this entry »


TIP: New Finder Commands #2: Add to Dock

2009/08/27

[One of a series regarding Snow Leopard’s new Finder menu commands.]

The new kid on the File menu block is Add to Dock, which shows up when you press Shift. Select an icon in the Finder, choose the command, and, voila—you’ve saved yourself from dragging something a mile across a large screen.

The Command-Shift-T shortcut for this menu choice that used to be assigned to Add to Favorites now works for this new command.


TIP: New Finder Commands #1: Services

2009/08/27

[One of a series regarding Snow Leopard’s new Finder menu commands.]

This isn’t a new item—but there’s an entirely new approach to the existing command, so I wanted to bring it to your attention. The Service menu has been relatively useless, and difficult to understand: Where do all those things come from? Why are most of them dim most of the time? And, most importantly: Why can’t I get rid of them? Read the rest of this entry »


TIP: Put the Character Palette in the Input menu

2009/07/20

While this is a standalone tip for anyone who doesn’t know how to activate the Input menu and put Character Palette in it, I was moved to post this specifically to support an Excel tip (Make Excel in-cell graphs look like bars). And, of course, I was then impelled to create the tip on accessing Character Palette without using the Input menu—but that works only in Apple and very-Apple-compliant programs. Read the rest of this entry »


TIP: Access the Character Palette without the Input menu

2009/07/20

You may or may not have the Input menu activated in your menu bar (it’s the one with the flag icon, the flag representing the language of your current input setting); you may or may not have the Character Palette listed in the menu. But you can open the Character Palette from an application’s Edit menu, or with a keyboard command whether you have the Character Palette in the Input menu or even if you don’t have an Input menu at all. Read the rest of this entry »